Impact of Medicare Prescription Fraud

Medicare Prescription Drug Program Fraud

How to Best Handle Fraud and Abuse of the Medicare’s Prescription Drug Program

Investing money in treating people addicted to narcotics might be a better answer to tackling the abuse plaguing the Medicare Prescription Drug Program. Reducing the incentive for doctors to illegally make money by prescribing prescription opioids and abusing the system, may help to take a chunk out of Medicaid fraud. Endowing monies to reduce addiction will not only decrease the drive and temptation for doctors to exploit the system but can aid in helping a large community of people dependent on prescription opioids get their life back.

Fraud and abuse continue to dog Medicare’s popular prescription drug program, despite a bevy of initiatives launched to prevent them, according to two new reports by the inspector general of Health and Human Services.

Their release follows the arrests of 44 pharmacy owners, doctors and others, who last week were accused of bilking the program, known as Part D.

… [Continue Reading]

Suburban Pot Problem in Birmingham, MI

Suburban Pot Problem in Birmingham, Michigan

Commissioner Tom McDaniel of Birmingham, Michigan is having issue of where to put a medical marijuana store in this high-income city but he said it is going to happen. Many residents are pushing back not wanting a medical marijuana store in the city. Legalization of marijuana is going on the Michigan ballot next year. Many worry that marijuana is a gateway to more addictive drugs and will escalate the drug problem that we already have here in Michigan and the United States.

 

Suboxone Linked to Charleston Shooting Suspect

Rapid Drug Detox Center’s hearts go out to the victims, family and friends of this unnecessary, tragic shooting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina.

Charleston mass shooting suspect Dylann Roof was questioned by police in February, 2015, for “asking out of the ordinary questions” of employees at two stores in the Columbiana Mall in Columbia, South Carolina. A search found a “small unlabeled white bottle containing multiple orange in color square strips” in Roof’s right jacket pocket. Roof admitted that the strips were Suboxone and that he had gotten them from a friend, and not a prescription. Roof was then arrested for possession of a schedule III controlled narcotic.… [Continue Reading]

Happy Father’s Day 2015!

Happy Father's Day 2015

Rapid Drug Detox Center wishes our clients and their families and friends a Happy Father’s Day and a life free from drug addiction.

OxyContin Help in Canada

Rapid-Drug-Detox-Center-Oxycontin-Help-in-CanadaEven using the most conservative estimate, 50-55,000 Canadians are opioid dependent, says the Canadian Executive Council on Addictions. Similarly, the Quebec surveillance network documents a shift among opioid-dependent individuals from heroin to prescription drugs. This will not, writes Dr. Roger Ladouceur in Canadian Family Physician, come as a surprise to anyone familiar with OxyContin.

Perhaps your doctors prescribed OxyContin when other painkillers stopped working. Although six million people a year take OxyContin, USA Today calls it a “prescription for trouble.” The US National Institute of Health recently reported that 23.9 million American adults —over 9 percent of the population—overused an addicting medication in the past month.

OxyContin is a controlled-release version of oxycodone hydrochloride. Like any narcotic intended for extended pain relief, it can quickly become addicting. Those addicted to OxyContin often crush the tablets, and then inject or snort them to get the drug into the bloodstream all at once. That increases your risk of addiction and can be fatal, even the first time you try it.

Opiate overdoses are rising sharply across Canada, thanks to an increase in prescription drug use, CBC news reports, quoting the Canadian Drug Policy Coalition. “It’s a national issue,” says Donald MacPherson, executive director of the Canadian Drug Policy Coalition. Over-prescribing opiates means “there’s a lot of prescription opioids out there in the market,” he says.

Doctors need to take more responsibility for educating people about the dangers, MacPherson writes. The more you use OxyContin, the more you need, which leads to addiction. Symptoms of addiction can include flabby muscles, shallow breathing leading to respiratory arrest, or a drop in your heart rate and blood pressure, which can bring on a coma and even death. Science Daily reports that “legal drugs such as OxyContin now kill more people than heroin and cocaine combined.” Dr Ladoceur predicts that nearly 10% of those who take it for pain become addicted.

Furthermore, there are risks with trying to detox [from non-prescription drugs] by substituting prescription drugs like Oxycontin, admits Dr. Michael Trew, Alberta’s chief addiction and mental health officer. Opiate users lose their tolerance to their drug quickly when they stop using it, he says; so if they relapse and go back to taking the same dosage, it could be enough to kill them.

Unfortunately, OxyContin withdrawal can painful. Withdrawal symptoms are like heroin withdrawal, and may include sweating, heart spasms, increased blood pressure, nausea, dehydration, abdominal cramps, trembling, weakness, muscle ache, diarrhea, vomiting, restlessness, leg spasms, insomnia, and mood disturbances such as irritability and thoughts of suicide.

So “going it alone” rarely works. Yet getting treatment in Canada isn’t easy. One mother in Calgary calls finding funded treatment for her own son “a constant struggle”; alternatively, three months at a local private facility would cost the family $33,000 (CAN).

“Physicians … in both cities and in rural areas, struggle with getting … treatment for their patients,” reports Dr. Susan Ulan, assistant registrar with the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta. “We know that many patients … [especially in rural areas look elsewhere] to access treatment.”

There is a better answer waiting for you, just across the border.

Short wait, proven results, one-fourth the cost…

The Rapid Drug Detox (RDD) Center, in Troy, Michigan, has a better way. The RDD Center’s Anesthesia OxyContin detox is a proven procedure that effectively reduces the pain and discomfort associated with conventional OxyContin detox.

Rapid anesthesia detoxification (The RDD Method®) is a medical procedure that “cleans” the OxyContin drug from your brain’s opiate receptors. It even eases you successfully through the “rebound anxiety” that often accompanies detoxification.

Instead of a difficult, several-week withdrawal period, RDD (rapid drug detox) treatment takes 3 days and eliminates most of withdrawal symptoms.

The actual procedure takes about an hour. After a brief, painless series of tests, you’ll be admitted to the operating room (O.R.). There, an experienced, board certified anesthesiologist gives you a medication to relax, and then administers a light, general anesthesia. While you rest comfortably, a team of experienced doctors “scrubs” the opiate receptors in your body, using an infusion of intravenous medications.

Once the OxyContin is removed from your receptors, the worst of the withdrawal is over. And you’ve slept through it all.

After the procedure, you recover under direct medical supervision. The RDD team of experienced medical professionals monitors your vital signs and your overall physical and mental reactions. In the days that follow the procedure, you may sleep more than usual.

Administered by professionals as part of a long-term drug-addiction recovery strategy, the RDD Method® has proven to be significantly more effective than older methods.

Will it work for you? The answer starts with a phone call. When you call, you get to talk to a professional nurse or an experienced intake coordinator. The call is toll-free. Click here now to contact the Rapid Drug Detox Center or call Rapid Drug Detox at 1-888-825-1020 now and take the first step toward a lifetime of freedom from addiction.

The RDD Center makes sure that nurses are on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and that the Center’s knowledgeable, licensed medical professionals are always available to answer all of your questions.

Suboxone® – What You Need to Know

Rapid-Drug-Detox-Center-Suboxone-What-You-Need-To-Know

Physicians use Suboxone® as a pain reliever. However, some try to treat one form of addiction (such as heroin) by substituting dependence on Suboxone®. Unfortunately, most physicians don’t realize that Suboxone® is more highly addictive than traditional opiates. This means that trying to break Suboxone addiction is even more difficult – and the withdrawal symptoms are more severe – than breaking your original dependence.

You need to know that trading one opiate drug for another is never an acceptable treatment.

Pharmaceutical literature reports many side effects from using Suboxone®. Those side effects include drowsiness, dizziness, weakness, constipation, headache, nausea, or vomiting, slow and shallow breathing, mental and mood changes, depression, stomach/abdominal pain, dark urine, yellowing eyes and skin, vision changes. In addition, the literature lists allergic reactions that include a rash, itching, swelling, severe dizziness, and trouble breathing.

The medical staff at the Rapid Drug Detox (RDD) Center records patients reporting additional symptoms, including profuse sweating, decreased libido, lack of motivation, sadness, low energy levels, decreased hormonal levels such as decreased testosterone in men and estrogen in women, decreased muscle mass, tone and strength, lack of zest for life, apathy, feeling hopeless, and urinary retention.

And, the Alberta Health Services warns, combining some substances (such as heroin, morphine, codeine, oxycodone), benzos, tranquillizers and sleeping pills (such as Valium©, Librium©, Ativan©, Xanax©) with Suboxone® can lead to overdose and death. Also, alcohol and Suboxone® make each other stronger, so drinking increases your risk of an overdose.

Yet doctors in Canada continue to prescribe this drug for withdrawal/addiction, never telling you that it, too, is addicting.

Suboxone® / Subutex / Buprenorphine withdrawal can be painful. Withdrawal symptoms typically start within 36 hours of your last use and can last over five weeks. Those symptoms include severe anxiety, sweating, malaise, depression, cramp-like pains in the muscles, leg kicking (as your body tries to “kick the habit”), severe and long lasting sleep difficulties (insomnia), diarrhea, goose bump skin (“cold turkey”), cramps, abdominal pain, dehydration, convulsions, fever and thoughts of suicide.

The symptoms of a “cold turkey” withdrawal can be so pronounced, intense, and uncomfortable that many patients revert back to their original drug use. Many have said that Suboxone® withdrawal is worse than it would be for their original opiate.

The answer waits just across the border: Rapid Anesthesia Suboxone® Detox

Fortunately, the Rapid Drug Detox (RDD) Center, just across the border, developed the RDD Method® for Suboxone® detoxification. This medical procedure takes place under anesthesia, and that eliminates most of the withdrawal symptoms. After a brief, painless series of tests, you’ll be admitted to the operating room (O.R.). There, an experienced, board certified anesthesiologist gives you a medication to relax, and then administers a light, general anesthesia, while you rest comfortably for approximately 60 minutes. While you rest, a team of experienced doctors “scrubs” the opiate receptors in your body, using an infusion of intravenous medications.

With the Suboxone® removed from your receptors, the worst of the withdrawal is over. And you’ve slept through it all.

While in the O.R., some patients elect to begin Naltrexone Therapy, so that the opiate drugs don’t re-attach to your “clean” receptors. In that case, while you sleep, Center physicians either place a small pellet just under your skin or administer a Sustained Release Injectable “IM” Shot. With the Naltrexone medication in your system, opiate drugs don’t re-attach to your “clean” receptors.

Note: Either the Naltrexone pellet delivery system or the Naltrexone injection is mandatory for Methadone and Suboxone®/Subutex patients. That’s because these drugs have a long “half-life,” which means that they hang in your system a long time. Only Methadone and Suboxone®/Subutex patients must choose either the 30-day Naltrexone injection or 90-day pellet delivery system, but every patient can choose them for the freedom they give.

All patients leave the Center with a year-long prescription of Naltrexone to fill at your local pharmacy. Donald MacPherson, executive director of the Canadian Drug Policy Coalition, believes that wider use of Naloxone in Canada could measurably reduce overdose deaths.

After the procedure, you recover under direct medical supervision. The RDD Center team of experienced medical professionals monitors your vital signs and your overall physical and mental reactions. In the days that follow the procedure, you may sleep more than usual.

Administered by experienced, medical professionals as part of a long-term drug-addiction recovery strategy, the RDD Method® has proven to be significantly more effective (and more cost-effective) than older methods. You can call the RDD Center at 1-888-825-1020 or contact them to learn more about beating Suboxone® addiction.

Because patients who undergo RDD treatment leave the Center 100% clean and free of any opiates, they are free of their addiction and their former cravings. If you’re considering detox treatment, it’s important to question any treatment centers you’re considering. Learn the truth about their programs. Trading one opiate drug for another should never be an option.

Suboxone® Treatment Canada

Rapid-Drug-Detox-Center-Suboxone-Treatment-CanadaJan Dunbar [not her real name] was a psychiatric nurse in Vancouver.I had a happy life, great family, supportive friends,” and no medical issues, she said. Then came the car accident and, with it, “chronic pain syndrome and burning mouth syndrome, due to nerve damage in my neck.” Her physician prescribed an opioid pain reliever. Thus, innocently, began what she calls her descent into hell.

Around 800,000 Canadians use prescription opioid drugs, such as oxycodone, codeine, morphine and Suboxone®, for pain says the Vancouver Sun, citing a Canadian Alcohol and Drug Use Monitoring Survey. More than 240,000 Canadians admit to abusing those drugs. In fact, Canada has displaced the United States as the world’s leading consumer of opioids, according to the International Narcotics Control Board. Correspondingly, Dr. Irfan A. Dhalla, of St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, notes a 5-fold increase in opioid-related deaths in Canada.

Physicians use Suboxone® as a pain reliever. However, some try to treat one form of addiction (such as heroin) by substituting dependence on Suboxone®. Unfortunately, most physicians don’t realize that Suboxone® is more highly addictive than traditional opiates. This means that trying to break Suboxone addiction is even more difficult – and the withdrawal symptoms are more severe – than breaking your original dependence.

Pharmaceutical literature reports many side effects from using Suboxone®. Those side effects include drowsiness, dizziness, weakness, constipation, headache, nausea, or vomiting, slow and shallow breathing, mental and mood changes, depression, stomach/abdominal pain, dark urine, yellowing eyes and skin, vision changes, and trouble breathing.

Just across the border, in Michigan, the medical staff at the Rapid Drug Detox (RDD) Center records patients reporting additional symptoms, including profuse sweating, decreased libido, lack of motivation, sadness, low energy levels, decreased hormonal levels such as decreased testosterone in men and estrogen in women, decreased muscle mass, tone and strength, lack of zest for life, apathy, feeling hopeless, and urinary retention.

Dr. Michael Trew, Alberta’s chief addiction and mental health officer, warns that such replacement therapies have risks. Opiate users lose their tolerance to the drug quickly after they stop using it; if they should relapse and go back to taking the same dosage, it could be enough to kill them.

The truth is that trading one opiate drug for another is never an acceptable treatment.

Yet, as nurse Jan Dunbar learned, quitting isn’t easy—even working in a hospital, she couldn’t do it alone. Setbacks happen frequently and most of those who try to quit alone fail.

The reason is no mystery: Suboxone® / Subutex / Buprenorphine withdrawal can be painful. Withdrawal symptoms typically start within 36 hours of your last use and can last over five weeks. Those symptoms include severe anxiety, sweating, malaise, depression, cramp-like pains in the muscles, leg kicking as your body tries to “kick the habit”), severe and long lasting sleep difficulties (insomnia), diarrhea, goose bump skin (“cold turkey”), cramps, abdominal pain, dehydration, convulsions, fever and thoughts of suicide.

Like most of those addicted, Jan needed professional medical help. Unfortunately, Canadians waiting for funded addiction treatment usually wait a long time. One client reported waiting for over a year.

Fortunately, many Canadians have found that help is available, without a long wait and at a reasonable cost, just across the border.

Three days to “drug free”

Why would men and women suffering from drug addiction come from all over the world to a small town in the U.S. to put an end to their drug addiction? Perhaps because the Rapid Drug Detox (RDD) Center there has developed a “detox” method that works. It’s fast, it’s effective, and it’s almost pain free. So it’s not surprising that nearly 98% of their patients cross at least one border to get there.

At the RDD Center, the medical procedure takes place under anesthesia, and that eliminates most of the withdrawal symptoms. After a brief, painless series of tests, you’ll be admitted to the operating room (O.R.). There, an experienced, board certified anesthesiologist gives you a medication to relax, and then administers a light, general anesthesia, while you rest comfortably for approximately 60 minutes. While you rest, a team of experienced doctors “scrubs” the opiate receptors in your body, using an infusion of intravenous medications.

With the Suboxone® removed from your receptors, the worst of the withdrawal is over. And you’ve slept through it all.

After the procedure, you recover under direct medical supervision. The RDD Center team of experienced medical professionals monitors your vital signs and your overall physical and mental reactions. In the days that follow the procedure, you may sleep more than usual.

Administered by experienced, medical professionals as part of a long-term drug-addiction recovery strategy, the RDD Method® has proven to be significantly more effective than older methods.

Because patients who undergo RDD treatment leave the Center 100% clean and free of any opiates, they are free of their addiction and their former cravings. If you’re considering detox treatment, it’s important to question any treatment centers you’re considering. Learn the truth about their programs. Trading one opiate drug for another should never be an acceptable treatment. The RDD Center’s physicians consider it misleading and the patients we see have rarely found it successful.

Will the RDD Method® work for you? The answer starts with a phone call. When you call, you get to talk to a professional nurse or an experienced intake coordinator. The call is toll-free. Click here now to contact the Rapid Drug Detox Center or call Rapid Drug Detox at 1-888-825-1020 now and take the first step toward a lifetime of freedom from addiction.

The RDD Center makes sure that nurses are on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and that the Center’s knowledgeable, licensed medical professionals are always available to answer all of your questions.

Methadone Detox in North America

Methadone-Detox-in-North-America

“Many of the [addicted] people I see in my practice started off on prescription opioids [that] they got from doctors,” writes physician Jennifer Melamed, M.D., in the Vancouver Sun.

Physicians use methadone as a pain reliever. However, patients don’t always use drugs the way doctor prescribes them. “Doctors, when they prescribe drugs, always assume patients are going to use it as prescribed,” says Raffi Balian, co-ordinator of a Toronto drug users’ program. For example, a study of opioid-dependent patients by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto shows that 63% got their drugs from legal prescriptions.… [Continue Reading]

The Importance of Staying Drug Free

Rapid-Drug-Detox-Drug-Free-Zone

Ask anyone who has broken free of addiction – it is a tortuous road to freedom.

Withdrawal symptoms – the sensations the body goes through as you attempt to quit usually begin shortly before your next scheduled dose of the drug. Sometimes they start just a few hours after your last dose, but usually they hit you between 6-12 hours after your last dose. Withdrawal symptoms can include irritability, sleeplessness, and increased appetite.

You may notice watery eyes, a runny nose, yawning; perhaps you start sweating or have trouble sleeping (insomnia). You may often feel restless, irritable, notice a loss of appetite, body aches, severe abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea or tremors. If your cravings get stronger, you may feel dysphoria (a profound state of unease), start to think about suicide, and get a strong craving for your drug. Those cravings for your drug of addiction all too often lead to relapse despite your best efforts to quit.… [Continue Reading]

Methadone Detoxification

Methadone-Detoxification-Rapid-Drug-Detox-Center

Physicians use methadone as a pain reliever. Some physicians use methadone to treat heroin addiction by substituting methadone for heroin. Unfortunately, they do not realize that methadone is even more addictive than traditional opiates like heroin. Breaking methadone addiction is even more difficult than quitting heroin and the symptoms of methadone withdrawal are more severe.

In a recent year, doctors prescribed enough prescription painkillers to medicate every American adult every 4 hours for a month. As a result, pain medication related visits to hospital emergency rooms has spiked over 98 percent in recent years. A recent video from Science Daily points out taxpayers often foot the bill.

Trading one opiate drug for another is never an acceptable treatment.… [Continue Reading]